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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

6 edition of A focus on peatlands and peat mosses found in the catalog.

A focus on peatlands and peat mosses

by Howard Alvin Crum

  • 363 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by University of Michigan Press in Ann Arbor .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Middle West.
    • Subjects:
    • Peatland plants -- Ecology.,
    • Peatland plants -- Ecology -- Middle West.,
    • Peatlands.,
    • Peatlands -- Middle West.,
    • Peat mosses.,
    • Peat mosses -- Middle West.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementHoward Crum in collaboration with Sandra Planisek.
      SeriesGreat Lakes environment
      ContributionsPlanisek, Sandra, 1948-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK938.P42 C78 1988
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 306 p., [1] leaf of plates :
      Number of Pages306
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2529363M
      ISBN 100472093789
      LC Control Number88004768

      A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. Johnson, C. W. (). Bogs of the Northeast. Hanover, NH: University of Press of New England. Priest, S. (). Sphagnum spp. Orono Bog Boardwalk [photo]. Fact sheet was created by Susan Priest, February and edited by Ronald B. Davis as an educational resource.   These peatlands – the largest in the lower 48 – started forming during the end of the ice age when depressions carved out by great glaciers created pools for sphagnum moss .

        Press Release issued for 8th July IPCC – Shocking degradation of Irish Peatlands needs Action Plan with Climate focus. The Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC) are undertaking an independent review of the status of Irish peatlands to inform a Peatlands and Climate Change Action Plan due to be released later this year.. In . Peat is the coarse soil, which we know from our potting mixes, that makes up the surface. Because the underlying plants haven’t decayed in the watery areas, they contain huge amounts of carbon, fixed in them by photosynthesis. As a result, peatlands play an important role as carbon sinks, keeping excessive greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere.

        Northern peatlands may hold twice as much carbon as scientists previously suspected, according to a study published today in Nature findings suggest that these boggy areas play a more important role in climate change and the carbon cycle than they’re typically given credit for. Sphagnum mosses grow from spores which are produced in fruiting bodies called capsules. When the spores are ripe, pressure builds up in the capsule until its lid is blown off, sending the spores shooting into the air. The spores grow into a tiny moss plant. As the tip or head of the plant grows upwards, the lower parts of the moss die and.


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A focus on peatlands and peat mosses by Howard Alvin Crum Download PDF EPUB FB2

A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses surveys the fens and bogs of the Upper Midwest, examining how plant life is directly affected by coldness, waterlogged peat accumulations, and habitats that become progressively more acidic and mineral poor.

Other topics explored include classification of peatlands, nutrient cycling, and the detailed taxonomy of peat mosses. A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses (Great Lakes Environment) Paperback – September 3, by Howard Crum (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings.

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Paperback "Please retry"Cited by: A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses surveys the fens and bogs of the Upper Midwest, examining how plant life is directly affected by coldness, waterlogged peat accumulations, and habitats that become progressively more acidic and mineral poor.

Other topics explored include. About this book. Includes chapters on the formation, functioning, and economics of peatlands, their characteristic vascular plants, and a richly illustrated taxonomic overview of North American peat mosses, especially in the Great Lakes region.

A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses (GREAT LAKES ENVIRONEMENT) by Crum, Howard Alvin; Planisek, Sandra and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Get this from a library.

A focus on peatlands and peat mosses. [Howard Crum; Sandra Planisek] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book: All Authors / Contributors: Howard Crum; Sandra Planisek.

Find more information about: ISBN: Get this from a library. A focus on peatlands and peat mosses. [Howard Crum; Sandra Planisek] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help.

Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create Book\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a>. Bogs are acid peatlands, poor in minerals and raised above the influence of groundwater by the accumulation of sodden, anaerobic peat.

They are dominated by a hummocky growth of Sphagnum covered by shrubby heaths (especially leather leaf and blueberries) and ultimately, in North America, by a black spruce muskeg (Crum, ). Peat (/ p iː t /), sometimes known as turf (/ t ɜːr f /), is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation or organic is unique to natural areas called peatlands, bogs, mires, moors, or muskegs.

The peatland ecosystem covers million square kilometres and is the most efficient carbon sink on the planet, because peatland plants capture CO 2 naturally released from the peat. Peatlands are referred to by various names such as bogs, fens, and mires.

According to the IPS, a mire refers to a peatland where peat is actively being formed (Table ).A bog, also known as an ombrogenous mire, is raised above the surrounding landscape and receives water only from precipitation.A fen, or geogenous mire, is situated in depressions and receives water that has.

Peatlands are unique ecosystems formed on peat, a type of soil that is created in waterlogged conditions where dead plants, such as moss, can’t rot down. Mosses that grow on peatlands act as sponges, holding in water and maintaining the wet conditions.

Why are peatlands special. Peatlands are home to many rare plants, insects and birds. Methane in peatlands bubbles up to the peat moss layer. Methane-consuming microbes in peat moss eat some of the gas released.

In effect, microbes in peat moss comprise a biofilter that reduces the amount of methane reaching the atmosphere. "We hypothesize that the methane-eating microbes in peat moss may crash as the climate gets warmer.

Peatlands International is sent out by email to all IPS members for free in four issues per year. The magazine consists of about pages with background reports on peat and peatlands, reviews of conferences, news items and books reviews. It also publishes research findings, business reports and internal information on the IPS.

New authors [ ]. Explore the latest full-text research PDFs, articles, conference papers, preprints and more on PEATLANDS. Find methods information, sources, references or conduct a literature review on PEATLANDS. A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses by Howard Alvin Crum starting at $ A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses has 2 available editions to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

Peat is a blonde to black organic sediment formed under waterlogged conditions from the partial decomposition of mosses and other bryophytes, sedges, grasses, shrubs or trees. By definition, the concentration of mineral matter in dry peats is less than 25% by weight. His studies on the peat mosses (Sphagnum) cover ecophysiology, competition, niche relations, and dispersal.

In more applied projects, he has dealt with the effects of nitrogen deposition and increased levels of carbon dioxide on mire ecosystems across Europe, and also worked with experiments on the restoration of drained peatlands.

Peat: The Most Efficient Carbon Sink In The World. Peatland ecosystems are the most efficient carbon sinks in the world, which means the area stores carbon and carbon-containing substances for long periods of time. Peatlands and their surrounding plant life work to trap the CO2 released by the decomposing peat.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for A Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses (GREAT LAKES ENVIRONEMENT) at Read. Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan T.D.

today (17th August, ) spent a day visiting bogs in Meath and Westmeath which are being rejuvenated through efforts by the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) of his Department with the assistance of Bord Na Móna, by the Irish Peatlands Conservation Council and other agencies and.

A class of BRYOPHYTA which is best known for Sphagnum forming PEAT bogs. | Explore the latest full-text research PDFs, articles, conference papers, preprints and more on SPHAGNOPSIDA.

Find methods.Because peatlands’ typical carbon content is over 50 percent, they become powerful greenhouse chimneys if disrupted. When peat is exposed to the air, the carbon it contains gets oxidized into carbon dioxide. It can take thousands of years to build up peat, but a matter of only a few to release its greenhouse cache once it is degraded.Care-Peat is an Interreg project with nine partners working together to reduce carbon emissions and restore the carbon storage capacity of different types of peatlands in North-West Europe.

The main partnership consists of five knowledge institutes and four nature organisations from Belgium, France, Ireland, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.